Libraries and visibility
Category: Skill Learning Tutorials
Shibaji Debnath | 338views
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The import and library directives can help you create a modular and shareable code base. Libraries not only provide APIs, but are a unit of privacy: identifiers that start with an underscore (_) are visible only inside the library. Every Dart app is a library, even if it doesn’t use a library directive.

Libraries can be distributed using packages.

Using libraries

Use import to specify how a namespace from one library is used in the scope of another library.

For example, Dart web apps generally use the dart:html library, which they can import like this:

import 'dart:html';

The only required argument to import is a URI specifying the library. For built-in libraries, the URI has the special dart: scheme. For other libraries, you can use a file system path or the package: scheme. The package: scheme specifies libraries provided by a package manager such as the pub tool. For example:

Specifying a library prefix

If you import two libraries that have conflicting identifiers, then you can specify a prefix for one or both libraries. For example, if library1 and library2 both have an Element class, then you might have code like this:

import 'package:lib1/lib1.dart';
import 'package:lib2/lib2.dart' as lib2;

// Uses Element from lib1.
Element element1 = Element();

// Uses Element from lib2.
lib2.Element element2 = lib2.Element();